Reading Research Blog

Our brain-computer interfacing technology uses music to make people happy

Music can have a powerful effect on our emotions. Reading cybernetics professor Slawomir Nasuto and colleagues are developing systems that can monitor activity in the brain and use this information to produce music to change how we feel. They explain more in a new post for The Conversation.

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Ripped, Torn & Cut: new book on how fanzines shaped punk

A book exploring the surge of fanzines that emerged in the wake of punk in the 1970s and 1980s was launched this week at the London College of Communication. Here, our very own ‘Punk Prof’ Matt Worley tells us more about the book, which was edited by the Subcultures Network hosted here at Reading.

 

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Heatwave ‘completely obliterated’ the record for Europe’s hottest ever June

The recent heatwave in Europe was the hottest June the world has ever recorded – and we can expect such events to become more common. We must provide more accurate and earlier warnings of oncoming weather hazards to give people chance to prepare writes Professor Hannah Cloke in a recent post for The Conversation.

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The Bees’ Needs: saving Britain’s pollinators

It’s Bees’ Needs week and once again London’s Carnaby Street has had a makeover to become ‘Carnabee Street’ until 15 July. Professor Simon Potts and the Reading Bee Team are there to encourage people to do their bit to protect pollinators as part of their wider programme of work to reverse the decline of these vitally important insects.

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In pictures: researchers at work

Images made by Reading PhD students at work were selected for an exhibition at our annual doctoral research conference last month, featuring diverse subjects from earth worms to food bank workers. Here the researchers tell the stories behind their pictures.

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Moving away from the ‘autism’ label

Today we’re hosting the Autistica Discover conference – bringing together scientists, clinicians, autistic people and their families to discuss the latest autism research discoveries. Sarah Harrop spoke to Professor Bhisma Chakrabarti about his work on understanding the features of autism – and why he doesn’t believe in diagnostic labels.

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African farmers join in research to help secure their futures

Insurance against poor harvests can give farming households some financial security in the harsh world of arable farming in Africa. As part of the TAMSAT project, which has been shortlisted for an Impact and Engagement Award, Dr Vicky Boult has recently been to Malawi to harness the local knowledge of farmers and use it to design better drought insurance products.

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Mohamed Morsi: death of Egypt’s former president shows deep state was always going to triumph

In a new post for The Conversation, Middle Eastern historian Dr Dina Rezk writes that Morsi’s inhumane treatment and subsequent fate is unexceptional in a regime set on imposing its will on the nation without concern for the human cost.

Mohammed Morsi meeting John Kerry in 2013.
Mohamed Morsi meeting John Kerry in 2013.

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England’s history of defaulting on European lenders shows repercussions of not paying Brexit bill

Failure to pay our European creditors is not a first for the English, as our medieval past shows. What has gone before reveals the damaging consequences of not paying our Brexit bill, write Henley Business School’s Professor Adrian Bell, Professor Chris Brooks and Dr Tony Moore in a recent post for The Conversation.

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