Reading Research Blog

Better cancer drug prescribing to help patients and doctors

Pharmacy student Daniel Mercer is one of two winners of Reading’s annual undergraduate research programme. We spoke to him about his research to improve prescription of cancer drugs and what it was like to be involved in a real-life research project before even getting his degree.

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Human rights, global wrongs

70 years ago today, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was created as a way to stop the horrors of Nazi Germany from ever happening again. In this lecture, given to mark the anniversary, Professor Rosa Freedman explains what human rights are, why they matter, and the challenges we face in ensuring that individuals have their fundamental rights protected.

Rosa Freedman is Professor of Law, Conflict and Global Development in the University of Reading’s School of Law.

#HumanRightsDay

Time is running out on climate change, but geoengineering has dangers of its own

Could a new technology which reflects sunlight away from our planet be the answer to climate change? Or would this unregulated techo-fix create new and terrible dangers of its own? Catriona MacKinnon, Director of the Reading Centre for Climate Justice, discusses the dark side of solar radiation management in a new post for The Conversation.

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Smoother and safer flying

Aviation turbulence can now be predicted up to 18 hours ahead, resulting in smoother flights for billions of passengers and helping to cut carbon dioxide emissions – all thanks to Professor Paul Williams’ research. His work has been recognised as runner-up for the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Societal Impact award. David Derbyshire reports.

The University of Reading's Professor Paul Williams whose research looks at aviation turbulence and climate change.
Professor Paul Williams . Image credit: Cass Productions.

  

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Beards, business and a history of facial hair in the workplace

As ‘Movember’ draws to a close, Business Historian Dr Lucy Newton explores the history of facial hair in the workplace, from ‘peak beard’ in the 1850s to today’s hipster handlebars, in a new post for The Conversation.

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THE LONG READ: Nancy Astor – pioneering, problematic and feminist by default

Today is the 99th anniversary of Lady Nancy Astor’s election to Parliament in a by-election in Plymouth, becoming the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons. This milestone is being marked with #Astor100:  an ambitious series of public events, learning resources, and the erection of a statue in her Plymouth constituency. In this ‘diablog’, Astor100 curator Dr Jacqui Turner from the University of Reading and Dr Julie V. Gottlieb from the University of Sheffield, whose recent book features Nancy Astor as a protagonist, discuss her life, legacy and varied political career.

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‘Limited evidence’ smart meters would save consumers money

Today’s revelation that there is ‘no realistic prospect’ of the UK Government meeting its smart energy meter installation target has led to it being labelled a ‘fiasco’ by critics. Jacopo Torriti, Professor of Energy Economics and Policy at the University of Reading, spells out why a complete rethink could be in order if we really want to save consumers money.

There is ‘limited evidence’ smart meters would lower energy bills as intended

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Sydney’s orange sky reminds us how unpredictable dust storms can be

Last week, a dust storm turned the Sydney skies orange and badly affected local air quality. Dr Claire Ryder explains why such phenomena occur and why more research is needed if we are to accurately forecast them, in a new post for The Conversation.

Satellite image from Himawari-8. The bright pink spot indicates the dust storm location. Image credit: UK Met Office.

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Smooth ride: air turbulence research shortlisted for NERC Impact Award

Climate change is increasing in-flight air turbulence: bad news for nervous flyers. But Dr Paul Williams has developed an algorithm to predict turbulence up to 18 hours ahead, resulting in smoother flights for billions of passengers and helping to cut CO2 emissions too. He’s recently been shortlisted for a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Impact award for the research. In this video made by NERC to celebrate the finalists, Paul explains his research and the positive impact it’s had for passengers, crew, the aviation industry and the planet.

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Spinal implant breakthroughs are helping people with paraplegia walk again

Could electrical devices implanted in the spine help make wheelchairs a relic of the past? Dr Ioannis Dimitrios Zoulias looks at recent biomedical engineering breakthroughs and where they might lead in a new post for The Conversation.

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