Reading Research Blog

Work less to save the planet? How to make sure a four-day week actually cuts emissions

There are clear health and environmental benefits to working a four-day week, but robotics, artificial intelligence and investments in less carbon intensive infrastructure would be needed to make it work says Henley Business School’s Professor Anupam Nanda in a new post for The Conversation.

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Nuclear powers once shared their technology openly – how Iran’s programme fell on the wrong side of history

As Iran steps up its nuclear programme, Professor Joseph O’ Mahoney explores the history and politics of restrictions on the use of atomic technology in a recent post for The Conversation.

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My summer of science: could Viagra be used to restore visual memory in Alzheimer’s?

Bozhana Stoyanova spent her summer doing Alzheimer’s research in Dr Francesco Tamagnini’s lab with a Physiological Society undergraduate studentship. Here she tells us about getting to grips with running experiments and investigating a possible new use for Viagra in restoring visual memory.

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Superblocks: Barcelona’s car-free zones could extend lives and boost mental health

Could car-free pockets of streets opened up to cyclists and pedestrians offer a solution to the urban problems of pollution and poor mental and physical health? In a recent post for The Conversation, Henley Business School’s Professor Anupam Nanda weighs up the pros and cons.

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Defeating dementia

From finding brain changes decades before dementia strikes to exploring the protective effects of speaking another language, Reading researchers are targeting the disease on several fronts. For World Alzheimer’s Day, we spoke to Dr Mark Dallas about some of the University’s cutting-edge research in this area.

Many of us will know someone affected with a dementia like Alzheimer’s disease. Dementia affects 50 million people around the world and that figure is set to reach 152 million by 2050. But we still don’t fully understand the disease nor do we have any treatments. More research is critical.

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Schools are failing pupils with special needs, despite best efforts of dedicated staff

Many children with special educational needs and disabilities aren’t learning and aren’t happy in school. A new report shows we need better support for these children and the staff who support them, write Cathy Tissot and Anna Tsakalaki in a new post for The Conversation.

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Why don’t local people have a greater say in their neighbourhoods?

Professor Gavin Parker’s research has been exploring the issues involved in neighbourhood planning since the policy was introduced by the government in 2011. In a new post for The Conversation, he writes about why the policy has not delivered what people, politicians and planners had hoped.

People power in Totnes. Sophie Wilder/Flickr., CC BY-NC

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