Reading Research Blog

New climate services networking group formed

Briony Turner from the IEA

Climate services professionals can grow their contacts and skills through Mesh – a new networking group. Briony Turner, Climate Services Development Manager for the Institute for Environmental Analytics based at University of Reading, and Space4Climate, explains more.

The irony of travelling the world to promote and nurture climate services is that not only do we increase our own carbon footprint but we often end of up travelling hundreds of miles to make valuable new contacts who are based on our doorstep in the UK.

It was out of a conversation discussing this at the Adaptation Futures Conference in Cape Town earlier this summer with Oxford-based Ben Smith, from GCAP (Global Climate Adaptation Partnership), that we decided to set up the UK’s first networking group for professionals in climate services at every level – research, policy, the public, private and third sector.

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‘Imprints’ egalitarian theory journal now available to all

The entire back catalogue of the journal Imprints: Egalitarian Theory and Practice has been made freely available by Professor Catriona McKinnon, of the Department of Politics and International Relations, who was the journal’s editor for several years.

Imprints editors Steve Smith, Chris Bertram, Saladin Meckled-Garcia, Catriona McKinnon and Alan Carlin

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Design competition helps local pharmacy spread the word about superbugs

A pharmacy in the Reading suburb of Woodley is hoping to tackle antibiotic-resistant bugs through prize-winning design – it’s hosting two separate installations masterminded by University of Reading typography and pharmacy researchers during September.

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‘Far right’ groups may be diverse – but here’s what they all have in common

Support for far-right parties is on the rise across Europe. While they differ in many ways, they are becoming increasingly embedded in national political systems with implications for the nature of democracy and policymaking in Europe, says Dr Daphne Halikiopoulou in a recent post for The Conversation.

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World War II bombing raids in London and Berlin struck the edge of space, our new study reveals

World war 2 bombing raids had an effect on the upper level of the Earth’s atmosphere, hundreds of miles away from where the bombs fell, according to research from Reading atmospheric scientist Chris Scott and historian Patrick Major. They explain more in a new post for The Conversation.

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Giving up on language learning? It doesn’t have to be this way!

The number of pupils studying languages at GCSE and A-level in England is low, but there are several ways to encourage young learners to stick at it. To mark European Day of Languages, Professor Suzanne Graham from the Institute of Education explains how their research is encouraging more pupils to learn a language at school.

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Is the Trump administration getting East Asia right, or just confusing it?

Trump began his presidency with a fairly traditional American approach to relations with East Asia – but then came his erratic decision in March to meet with Kim Jong-un. US Modern History specialist Mara Oliva explores the US-East Asian geopolitical situation over the past few months in a recent post for The Conversation.

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Sleepwalking towards the next financial crisis? Here are the five biggest risks

Ten years on from the demise of Lehman Brothers, former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown believes we are drifting towards another crash – but is he right? Nafis Alam examines the factors that will be critical in any future crisis in a recent post for The Conversation.

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Robotic trousers could help disabled people walk again

Could robotic trousers be the answer to mobility problems? Reading Biomedical Engineering postdoc Ioannis Dimitrios Zoulias looks the latest developments in technology to get disabled people back on their feet in a recent post for The Conversation.

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Microplastics are getting into mosquitoes and contaminating new food chains

Tiny fragments of plastic are being eaten by water-dwelling mosquito larvae and retained in their bodies as they develop to the flying stage, contaminating new food chains as the insects are eaten by bats and birds. Reading’s Dr Amanda Callaghan, who made the finding, tells us more in a new post for The Conversation.

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